01. Brands used WeChat to deliver bespoke experiences in 2020 and the New Year. 

Dolce & Gabbana’s sparkly red Happy Holidays post let users create their own customized video, as well as download stickers to share on WeChat.

Coach encouraged users to create their own “Defining 2020” post to ring in the new year with their own word-of-choice and pictures on a branded template.

Pandora guided users to write a letter of appreciation to someone special, alongside pre-filling their cart with charms to match the letter’s contents.

Chow San San’s Promessa line uses an AI chatbot to get to know their customer’s style, learning about everything from their taste in music to their zodiac sign before making ring recommendations.

 

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02. Dunhill’s wooftastic post garnered high engagement.

Dunhill garnered tons of engagement with a wooftastic WeChat post – And we finally know what our dogs are saying!

“Woof! Take You to the Streets” had three pups, Ark, Sal, and Theo, help showcase Dunhill’s all-new Signature collection and 2020 autumn/winter series. 

As fantastic as the pups’ walking buddies looked, the true highlight of the post was what the dogs themselves had to say. Ark wanted his pal to know “I’m proud of you” and  Sal reassured his that he’d help him ”break the ice” and make new friends out on the town.

Though the readership was on the small side at under 2,000, engagement was through the roof (or woof?) at 3% - compare that to the less than 1% that brands with larger followings, like Pandora and Valentino, got over the same weekend. 

Nice job, pups! 🐕


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03. Off-White drops WeChat exclusive series: Our thoughts on how this fits in the streetwear market.

The capsule collection, under 30 items, features paint-splattered denim jackets, pants, and shorts, along with several laser-printed blue-checked denim pieces and black and white hoodies. The collection is sold exclusively in its WeChat mini program.

Accessories include bucket hats, handbags, Airpod cases, and phone bags. All products sell in the mini-program store for between 2,960 and 9,140 RMB.

This drop came in between two major streetwear conventions: just before Sneaker Con this past weekend in Shanghai and following Innersect (also in Shanghai) earlier in December. 

Streetwear occupies an interesting space, where the culture is based off an accessible, common experience and personal expression – and yet exclusivity thrives (think of the Dior x Air Jordan 1 High OG sneakers reselling for 99,999 RMB). Off-White’s WeChat-only release denim series fits in this model well with accessible price points.

China’s streetwear culture is booming, with, for example, shows like Street Dance of China (on Youku) and The Rap of China (on iQIYI) wildly popular. Yet, according to the 2019 Streetwear Impact Report, respondents said social media was one of the greatest sources of inspiration, indicating that WeChat not an unwise choice of focus.

 

 


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04. The relatable KOL of 2021 is one luxury brands shouldn’t ignore: We’ve highlighted three favorites.

Teacher Xu (Fiona Xu, IG: shenyefachi, Weibo: 深夜徐老师) has a peppy, casual style and 6.7 million followers on Douyin. Her videos and posts cover everything from showing her followers how to get that perfectly ”clean” look with Shiseido’s liquid foundation to sharing beauty consumption reports.

iDest magazine, with nearly 2.2 million followers on Weibo, mixes luxury with the down-to-earth. The magazine moves seamlessly between reporting on Bottega Venetta’s new line, Pantone’s color of the year, and the founder Ye Fei’s puppies, Miumiu and Prada. 

Emma Zhang (Oh Emma), a Toronto-based Youtuber with nearly 400K subscribers, has already worked with luxury brands like Tods. With 10 million Chinese-born people living abroad, Zhang’s mostly Mandarin-language videos connect brands to shoppers that often have significant disposable income.

Also called Big V’s (V’s), these influencers are notably bringing luxury brands into the more relatable, personality-infused digital space of Millennials and Gen Z’s in China.

Check out Business of Fashion’s full report here.

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